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The Science of Sleep
Posted: 25 September 2007 02:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Wow, thanks for the link!
This would explain a lot of my problems.. a LOT.
Peace!

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Posted: 27 September 2007 10:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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http://tinyurl.com/3789dp

Less Sleep = More Dreams

very good article

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Posted: 28 September 2007 02:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I remember reading a while back that the only reason people needed sleep was to dream.

So I’m guessing they were wrong

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Posted: 28 September 2007 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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thirtyseven - 27 September 2007 10:15 PM

http://tinyurl.com/3789dp

Less Sleep = More Dreams

very good article

However, it also appears that a longer period of sleep will result in near-permanent dreaming states.

This would fit my experience, if it is the case, for the time I slept for more than a day.  I slept for about 36 hours, strait, and the only reason I woke up is because I felt hungry.  I remember being in the dream state and thinking “hmm.. my body is hungry; my real body needs food. I should wake up now,” and then I did.  The sleep state I was in during the last few hours seemed to be a dream state the entire time.. of course, I have no clinical monitor to validate this memory.

This being the case, I wonder that if I were to maintain that dream state long enough, if REM would be permanent and would replace my waking life element?  Would this become my own permanent sleeping cycle?  Hm.

Of course, more research should be done.. and I am not one for taking needles in the arm for nutrients, so I suppose I am a poor candidate choice for being a “permanent REM sleep explorer” though I think my ability to remember the real world and know the difference between the dream and “real” allows me to wake up and thus prevent a seriously permanent dream state....  damn this has me curious.. I wonder if I could sleep for a week in just a dream state… I bet that would cause some serious atrophy!

heheehheheh exciting grin

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Posted: 01 October 2007 09:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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From the “We Never Really Learn Anything” department:

“Both Short and Long Sleep is Associated with Increased Mortality”

http://www.physorg.com/news110455029.html

The first study to assess the stability of three aspects of sleep behavior in relation to long-term mortality finds an increased risk of mortality in short sleep, long sleep and frequent use of medications, according to a study published in the October 1 issue of the journal SLEEP.
The study, authored by Christer Hublin, MD, PhD, of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in Helsinki, Finland, focused on the responses of 21,268 twins to questionnaires administered in 1975 and 1981. The subjects were categorized as follows:

-- Short sleepers (less than seven hours)

-- Average sleepers

-- Long sleepers (more than eight hours)

-- Sleeping well

-- Sleeping fairly well

-- Sleeping fairly poorly/poorly

-- Not users of hypnotics and/or tranquilizers

-- Infrequent users of hypnotics and/or tranquilizers

-- Frequent users of hypnotics and/or tranquilizers

According to the results, significantly increased risk of mortality was observed both for short sleep in men (+26 percent) and in women (+ 21 percent), and for long sleep (+24 percent and +17 percent respectively), and also frequent use of hypnotics/tranquilizers (+31 percent in men and +39 percent in women). The effect of sleep on mortality varied between age groups, with strongest effects in young men.

Between 1975 and 1981, sleep length and sleep quality changed in about one-third of the population. In men, there was a significant increase for stable short (1.34) and stable long (1.29) sleep for natural deaths, and for external causes in stable short sleepers (1.62).

This study found an association between sleep behavior (most notably in sleep length) and mortality. The exact mechanisms remain unclear, and they should be assessed in experimental settings and other longitudinal studies. Morbidity and functional limitations as less severe outcomes should also be considered. Although the effect of sleep on mortality is fairly modest compared to, for example, smoking or components of the metabolic syndrome, it is still of considerable significance as it is associated with several common disorders such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Optimizing sleep – in addition to disorder-specific treatment – could improve prognosis in these disorders. Our results add evidence to the association between sleep and health outcomes,” said Dr. Hublin.

Those who think they might have a sleep disorder are urged to discuss their problem with their primary care physician, who will issue a referral to a sleep specialist.

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Posted: 02 October 2007 10:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Sheesh… I wonder if we’ll ever figure ourselves out?

I know a doctor that only sleeps 4 hours a night… and he seems unable to do more than that!
He’s a very driven man, too.. it is amazing to see him in action, I think.

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